Paul Rusling, Laser 558, radio, index Paul Rusling

In the mid-1970s Paul and Anne moved to London and managed several pubs and clubs, working for night club chains Mecca, Scamps, Baileys and Top Rank in places as diverse as Manchester, Leeds, Huddersfield, and Croydon.

Paul and Anne also became pub managers and ran several pubs, always in the London area. Details of Paul and Anne's pub career are found on THIS PAGE.


















Broadcast Consultant

In 1981 Paul became a broadcast consultant and since then has worked at, or for, several radio stations. One of the first Paul worked for as a consultant was Laser 558, an offshore station in the Thames estuary. Laser attracted over 8 million listeners in its short life. More details here.

Paul and Anne worked for many other broadcasters, ranging from Classic FM, Sky, Virgin and Radio Veronica to  . . .well, those are best discussed on another page.

Writing

From 1989 to 1991 Paul and Anne Rusling  published a weekly paid-for newspaper in East Yorkshire called the

Haltemprice Herald.

(see
Writing page
)

Paul began his writing with a solumn in SCRIPT magazine in 1973 and has since written for around a dozen publications.  Among these have been Ships Monthly, World Broadcast News (for whom he was UK correspondent for ten years), DMC Disco Mix Club magazine  and The Radio Magazine in the UK.

He has also had articles in several national newspapers in the UK including The Times, The Yorkshire Post, The Daily Mirror, The Sun and The Sunday Times.

In 2016 he wrote a guide to building and launching online radio stations called Internet Radio 2016. He also wrote a lengthy book called The Radio Adventures of the MV Communicator, telling the story of the 11 radio stations that broadcast from the radio ship during her 121 year career as an offshore radio station.

More details on this page.


Paul Rusling, as DJ Paul Alexander in 1973
Paul Rusling on the Mi Amigo liffeboat
Welcome!   to the Paul Rusling personal web site.
Paul's parents Barbara and David Rusling moved back to the Hull area when he was very young and as a baby and toddler Paul was brought up in Dunswell, a tiny village to the north of Hull, where his grandparents lived. 

The family later moved to Linnaeus Street, off Hessle Road, the legendary home of Hull's fishing fleet, where Paul's father had been raised. After a couple of siblings were born, the family moved further along Hessle Road to Wellsted Street (a street that's spelt differently at each end!). The family continued to grow, and soon Paul had three brothers and three sisters. The family was completed in 1966 with the birth of Paul's youngest sister, Alison, who joined Andrew, Pamela, Peter, Robert and of course Lynne. In 1970 the Rusling family moved to an even larger home on Fitzroy Street off Beverley Road in Hull.

Adelaide and Riley 

In 1961 Paul moved to Adelaide Junior School,  a brand new school then, where he sat the 11+ exam and achieved a place at Riley Technical Grammar School.  Although the buildings at Parkfield Drive were quite new,  Riley had a long history of turning out excellent breed of engineers, complete with solid German and maths departments. Paul was a keen student and did well at sciences, languages and academic subjects but had little time for art or woodwork. He played soccer but was far more interested in music and girls.

By day he studied radio engineering at College of Technology, eventually qualifying as a ship's radio officer, a course that required seven terms of full time study.  Paul had two separate periods in the tower block at the end of Queens Gardens, usually wondering how he could best use the nearby Willam Wilberforce statue radiate MW radio signals!

The regular course work though was a very thorough grounding in 'Radio & LIne Transmission', every aspect of radio generally plus radar, and all manner of logic controlled electronics.  And a requirement to achieve at least 25 wpm Morse Code. Pounding Morse out on a key was not Paul's intention however, he wanted nothing more than to be "pulling the triggers on a pair of twin 45s".




Anne Rusling, on the set of Thunderbirds
At Riley, Paul collected eight GCEs, but opted out of A Levels to study electronics at the College of Technology in Hull. There was just not enough electronics on the  Riley curriculum, which by his mid-teens was all that mattered to Paul. 

Paul worked at Ideal Radio on Hessle Road most Saturdays when he wasn't at the teenagers' disc sessions at the Hull Locarno. 




The Love of Paul's Life

In 1972 Paul met the love of his life, an unlikely looking partner - Anne Pyrah.  Anne was noticably taller and far better looking than Paul, so he was clearly punching "well above his weight".  After a lengthy engagement (six years!) they finally did get married. 

At their wedding everyone was agreed: "It wouldn't last".  Paul's mother was the most generous - she gave their marriage six months!  After taking everyone to the New York for a reception they spent their honeymoon in Belgium and Holland, including a Dutch Radio Convention!  Anne has managed to stay the course and they have been together now for 45 years!


  





Riley Technical High School - my Alma Mater

  Love of Paul's life,

Anne Pyrah,

(now Mrs Anne Rusling)


Technical College

While he enjoyed his school days and made many friends, Paul couldn't wait to leave Riley High School and devote more time to music and radio, which were the only things that mattered in his life.  Straight after completing his GCE O-Levels he enrolled at the College of Technology in Hull's Queen's Gardens, initially for an OND in Sciences. A much more practical seat of learning, it was a centre of excellence in modern engineering, particularly marine engineering and more importantly, marine RADIO ENGINEERING!

In 1966 Paul had become bewitched by a succession of offshore radio stations which were then flourishing, and thanks to powerful transmitters were heard well in East Yorkshire. Radio Caroline first, then Swinging Radio England and then Yorkshire's very own Radio 270

Paul became pretty close to the latter station and got to know the MD, Wilf Proudfoot and his advertising manger Maurice Jeffery very well as well as some of the DJs, who encouraged him. Paul began working in clubs as a weekend DJ while still at school and he set up the CRSC to campaign for independent radio.  That eventually saw him working on the legendary Radio Caroline, the start of a career in broadcasting that continues over forty years later.
Paul at the Scamps and Hoffbrauhaus in Hull
In 1973 Paul joined Radio Caroline which had just launched a new Radio Caroline International service in English. The station was using two huge transmitters on different wavelengths at the same time and could be widely heard over much of western Europe.

Paul hosted the breakfast programme on the station, which  was broadcasting from a  former coaster The Mi Amigo.  Radio Caroline had by then led something of an erratic life, although it was still a "hot-rockin', flame-throwing" Top 40 hit music station. At the time, the UK had only BBC national stations; this was before the days of commercial radio in Britain, when no one else but the BBC were allowed to broadcast.

The station was  run by one of Paul's radio heroes, Chris Cary (aka Spangles Maldoon!) and the legendary Ronan O'Rahilly. Ronan and Chris were keen to harness Paul's enthusiasm and slightly odd style of presentation. 




Paul was never a reserved, warm or mellow radio presenter and he could certainly never be described as 'laid back'. Paul would never have been at home with the BBC - he rocked and jocked in the upbeat style that he had honed in night clubs in the North and did everything with 100% energy and enthusiasm.

Radio Caroline continues to broadcast today on the internet and over  Manx Radio in the Isle of Man.  

For more details of

Radio Caroline,

see THIS PAGE
Paul Rusling was born in a Yorkshire seaside town back in the 1950s. Paul's mum Barbara was on the beach when he decided to put in his appearance and so Barabra was taken into the Alexandra Hotel on Bridlington sea front to await the ambulance. And that's where Paul was born.

There is no blue plaque there (its now a huge modern pool and gym development called Leisureworld) but Paul was given its name as a second Christian name - making him

Paul Alexander Rusling

.  (Paul's sister Lynne continued the tradition; she is called "Lynne Beverley"; being born at the  Westwood Hospital in Beverley). 

Radio Caroline International

Paul Rusling

  

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Paul Rusling in n2015.

Pubs, Clubs

& Bars

In 2006 Paul and Anne returned to the licensed trade. They bought a pub called  the Triton Inn,  in the small country village of Brantingham, East Yorkshire.

Just ten miles from the city of Hull, the Triton had a huge car park, a purpose built restaurant and a small ballroom on the side for functions, etc.  They developed this business over the next eight years and sold the Triton Inn in August 2013.
Twitter Bird

Adelaide and Riley 

In 1961 Paul moved to Adelaide Junior School,  a brand new school then, where he sat the 11+ exam and achieved a place at Riley Technical Grammar School.  Although the buildings at Parkfield Drive were quite new,  Riley had a long history of turning out excellent breed of engineers, complete with solid German and maths departments. Paul was a keen student and did well at sciences, languages and academic subjects but had little time for art or woodwork. He played soccer but was far more interested in music and girls.
Paul's parents Barbara and David Rusling moved back to the Hull area when he was very young; as a baby and toddler Paul was brought up in Dunswell, a tiny village, where his grandparents lived. 

The family later moved to Linnaeus Street, off Hessle Road, the legendary home of Hull's fishing fleet, where Paul's father had been raised. After a couple of siblings were born, the family moved further along Hessle Road to Wellsted Street (a street that's spelt differently at each end!).

The family continued to grow, and soon Paul had three brothers and three sisters. The family was completed in 1966 with the birth of Paul's youngest sister, Alison, who joined Andrew, Pamela, Peter, Robert and of course Lynne. In 1970 the Rusling family moved to an even larger home on Fitzroy Street off Beverley Road in Hull.

Nightclub DJ

In  his spare time Paul performed as a disc jockey in clubs and ballroom to pay his way through college as there were no 'grants' in those days. Among the clubs he worked at in those formative years were the Music Box (later the Bierkeller) in Bishop Lane in Hull, the Penny Farthing on Spring Bank, the Gondola Club in Little Queen Street, the Locarno Ballroom in Ferensway and Scamps in George Street.
In the mid-1970s Paul and Anne moved to London and managed several pubs and clubs, working for night club chains Mecca, Scamps, Baileys and Top Rank in places as diverse as Manchester, Leeds, Huddersfield, and Croydon.

Paul and Anne also became pub managers and ran several pubs, always in the London area. Details of Paul and Anne's pub career are found on THIS PAGE.

Broadcast Consultant

In 1981 Paul became a broadcast consultant and since then has worked at, or for, several radio stations. One of the first Paul worked for as a consultant was Laser 558, an offshore station in the Thames estuary. Laser attracted over 8 million listeners in its short life. More details here.

Paul and Anne worked for many other broadcasters, ranging from Classic FM, Sky, Virgin and Radio Veronica to  . . .well, those are best discussed on another page.

Writing

From 1989 to 1991 Paul and Anne Rusling  published a weekly paid-for newspaper in East Yorkshire called the

Haltemprice Herald.

(see
Writing page
)

Paul began his writing with a solumn in SCRIPT magazine in 1973 and has since written for around a dozen publications.  Among these have been Ships Monthly, World Broadcast News (for whom he was UK correspondent for ten years), DMC Disco Mix Club magazine  and The Radio Magazine in the UK.

He has also had articles in several national newspapers in the UK including The Times, The Yorkshire Post, The Daily Mirror, The Sun and The Sunday Times.

In 2016 he wrote a guide to building and launching online radio stations called Internet Radio 2016. He also wrote a lengthy book called The Radio Adventures of the MV Communicator, telling the story of the 11 radio stations that broadcast from the radio ship during her 121 year career as an offshore radio station.

More details on this page.
Menu
Welcome! 
to the Paul Rusling web site.

In 1973 Paul joined Radio Caroline which had just launched a new Radio Caroline International service in English. The station was using two huge transmitters on different wavelengths at the same time and could be widely heard over much of western Europe.

Paul hosted the breakfast programme on the station, which  was broadcasting from a  former coaster The Mi Amigo. Radio Caroline had by then led something of an erratic life, although it was still a "hot-rockin', flame-throwing" Top 40 hit music station. At the time, the UK had only BBC national stations; this was before the days of commercial radio in Britain, when only the BBC were allowed to broadcast.
In 1966 Paul had become bewitched by a succession of offshore radio stations.  Radio Caroline first, then Swinging Radio England and then Yorkshire's very own Radio 270.
Paul became pretty close to the latter station and got to know the MD, Wilf Proudfoot and his advertising manger Maurice Jeffery very well as well as some of the DJs, who encouraged him. Paul began working in clubs as a weekend DJ while still at school and he set up the CRSC to campaign for independent radio. 

That eventually saw him working on the legendary Radio Caroline, the start of a career in broadcasting that continues over forty years later.